In a remote village outside Yangon, Carrie began talking to girls who’d recently turned 9. Her message was ‘All women are beautiful and powerful naturally. That means that periods are beautiful too.”

“In most of the villagers, no-one educates the girls why they bleed, it’s just too shameful to talk about. Can you imagine? We’ve met girls who use bark to hide the blood, or any cloth or paper. The reality is that if you don’t understand why you are menstruation, it’s scary and can carry shame.”

Days For Girls each Thursday brings together up to 30 volunteers meeting at the America Club to sew pads and prepare kits.

These pads are hygienic, 100 percent cotton, and reusable for around 3 years.
After a 1-hour lesson, girls are given a pretty bag with a small soap, hand towel, underpants, menstruation chart and pads.

Yangon based Days For [email protected] aims to produce up to 200 kits annually with distribution in the Yangon region and eventually throughout Myanmar.

A priority is working with girls in monasteries and orphanages providing access to women’s hygiene education.

In 2017 Carrie left Hong Kong for Yangon.

“I want to devote my energy to efficient and sustainable work that educates and changes lives. Days For Girls does exactly that”.

Since 2008 the organization has worked to empower girls, and to protect themselves, working in 100 countries and having distributed 1 million kits in Africa and internationally.

Carrie welcomes volunteers, partnerships, material and cash donations.

Visit: Days For Girls
Email: [email protected]
Days For Girls is affiliated to Singapore Days For Girls Chapter.

 

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